Health, Safety, Security & Environmental (HSSE)
Management Consulting Services for the Pipeline
Construction Industry
HSSE Management System (MS) Documents

Peter Kinsey

pipe-line-safety@outlook.com
 
Pipeline Construction
Hazard Recognition & Risk Management

A Safe Job
On Time
Below Project Target Incident Rates
 
 
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HSSE MS Documents
 
content

A risk-based Health and Safety  Management System

Safety is an attitude and needs to be proactive not reactive.


Pipeline construction work is fast paced, complex and dangerous, where workers are exposed to a menu of constantly changing, life threatening risks, as the work progresses along the pipeline corridor and the worksite ground conditions underfoot continuously change…The work is hazardous and strenuous. It is undertaken at remote worksites, with limited access making it difficult to monitor and control.
 
Preventing accidents and injuries cannot be left to chance.  It requires extensive planning and taking extraordinary precautions.
 
The degree of success or failure of your Health and Safety Management System is measured by the number of incidents and accidents occurring on your project
 
In most developed countries, company officers of pipeline construction projects, who engage workers to undertake work for them:
 
a)  Are liable for the incidents and accidents occurring on their project
b)  Have  a legal obligation to exercise due diligence to ensure that their construction business complies with the national Workplace Health and Safety Act and Regulations
c)   Have a duty of care to consider all risks associated with the work carried out by their workers, not only those for which regulations and codes of practice exist 
d)  Have an obligation to gain an understanding of the hazards and risks associated with the operations of the business or undertaking
e)  Must ensure that the business or undertaking has and uses appropriate resources and processes to eliminate or minimize risks to the health and safety of their workforce.

The success of your Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) will be directly proportional to the degree of support and interest you as a Construction or Project Manager invest in it.  The success of your project HS Team in maintaining published project target incident rates is directly proportional to the extent you listen to and empower them. The function of the HSSE Team is to identify gaps and to advise construction management where action(s) can be taken to bring HS improvement.  Often this advice is taken as personal criticism by construction management and when it is, your HSMS will most surely fail. Egos and politics are often the cause for high project incident rates.

 
The management concept used to exercise such due diligence, that has been used since the 1940s, follows a simple process identified in the diagram below:

The Deming Circle.


PLAN – refers to a written, risk based, Health and Safety Management System. (HSMS)  DO – refers to the implementation of the  HSMS plans and procedures.  CHECK –refers to inspections and audits that are conducted to assure compliance with the HSSE Management System plans and procedures.  ACT – refers to corrective actions that are taken to close any gaps identified in the audits and inspections.
 
PLAN - The first step in establishing your HSMS, is to conduct a project risk assessment (Major Hazard Risk Assessment – MHRA).  The first step of your project risk assessment is to establish and implement a planned and structured process: a hazard identification study, to comprehensively identify all your workplace hazards.
 
A hazard is defined as any circumstance or condition which poses the risk of an unplanned or unwanted event, with a potential for harm in terms of human injury or ill health, damage to property, the workplace environment or a combination of these.
 
The second step in establishing your HSMS, is to assess the associated risks. This involves understanding the nature of the harm that could be caused by the hazard, how serious the harm could be and the likelihood of it happening.  This is called risk ranking.  Following this exercise you will be able to identify and focus on your project’s specific high risk activities. Additionally you will be able to prioritize your risk management effort to implement the most effective control measures and to minimize the possibility of any unplanned events.

If you don´t know history you are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past.

 
Major accidents by their nature are rare events, which may be beyond the experience of your pipeline Company practitioners/officers. Knowledge of these past loss events is often referred to as “lessons learned”. These accidents tend to be low frequency, high consequence events as illustrated in the many photographs on this website.  Proactive identification of the hazards, circumstances or conditions that could lead to a major accident may require the mobilization of additional resources such as a Pipeline Construction Hazard Identification Specialist with extensive site-based HS management experience and a comprehensive knowledge of pipeline construction industry lessons learned.
 
Your demonstration of due diligence, includes:

  1. Requiring the contractor/employer, in consultation with employees, to identify: all reasonably foreseeable hazards on and off the right of way (R.O.W.) that may cause a major accident.
  2. Taking reasonable steps to gain an understanding of the hazards and risks associated with the many activities which will be undertaken along the R.O.W. &

The HSMP is the over-arching document in your PLAN, in which the Plans and Procedures required to mitigate all project risks will be identified. Only after you have comprehensively identified the workplace hazards,  can you write your Health and Safety Management Plan (HSMP) and develop a project HSMS document map, which will identify safe work plans and procedures (HS document deliverables) to eliminate or minimize the risks associated with each specific identified hazard. These plans and procedures comprise your Health, Safety, Security and Environmental Management System (HSSE MS),  
 
As a Company officer, the most important demonstration of your due diligence or duty of care and the best insurance for delivering an accident free project is time allocated to identifying hazards.  Know this: If this hazard identification process is not followed, your duty of care will be incomplete. An inadequate number of project hazards will be identified, unnecessarily exposing your project workers to potential harm…and exposing project management to potential liability. A common mistake is to omit this initial corporate responsibility and  attempt to fulfill this hazard identification duty of care at the work front with JHAs, START cards and other hazard identification processes, conducted by workers with inadequate experience and knowledge of the work.  JHAs and START cards are good for picking up hazards associated with changing work conditions.  Identifying all reasonably foreseeable hazards requires corporate involvement: a formal HAZID early in the engineering phase of the project.
 
The best practice for identifying Hazards is a Construction HAZID (Hazard Identification Study).  A HAZID is a structured brainstorming process which is the first and essential step in your PLAN. This brainstorming is a structured group process, utilized to increase the scope of hazard recognition.  
 The HAZID identifies what hazards could possibly cause a major accident (hazard identification).  The HAZID is a separate but integral part of the Major Hazard Risk Assessment (MHRA) which analyses how likely it is that a major accident may occur, the potential consequences (risk assessment) and what options there are for preventing and mitigating a major accident (control measures). The HAZID must address potentially rare events and situations to ensure the full range of major accidents and their causes are considered.
Knowledge of pipeline construction industry hazards cannot be learned in an engineering or Health and Safety school curriculum.  The composition of the HAZID Study Team is important. An effective HAZID process is dependent upon having the right people participating in the process. The right people are not corporate managers with little or no practical site-based experience. It is critical to draw on the knowledge and experience of your on-site management, who are and have been directly involved in execution of the work for many years: your spread men, front and back end assistant superintendents, foremen, site safety managers, safety officers, and senior equipment operators.  The practical experience of these participants brings to the table valuable lessons learned.   Use of a Pipeline Construction Hazard Identification Specialist and/or professional HAZID facilitator invariably expedites the process, maximizes the findings and the validity of the HAZID process, as a demonstration of your effort to take every reasonably practical effort to protect workers under your supervision from harm.
 
Many hazards and their associated risks are well known in the pipeline construction industry and have well established and accepted control measures.  These control measures are often referred to in contractual documents as “Industry Standards”,  however,  “Industry Standards” are not identified and defined in any industry accepted guideline or audit system. (For more on “Industry Standards” refer to the  PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION E-LEARNING CENTRE on this website’s home page.) 
 
The  findings of the HAZID and  MHRA facilitates an orderly  and logical process of  HS management, and is utilized to enhance the project’s Construction and Corporate (Schedule and Financial) Risk Registers,  which is required by many licensing authorities and company in-house standards.  The Construction Risk Register is then used to generate an HS Commitments Register, which is tied to the pipeline contract.
 
The HS  plans and procedures generated from this process describe how your project will fulfill its obligations to protect the environment, employees and the public from potential impacts of your operations and activities.  These documents describe the company structure, responsibilities, practices, procedures, processes, resources and expected behaviors needed to implement company policies and any associated objectives and targets.  The primary purpose of these documents is to establish a safe workplace where all foreseeable hazards are identified and risks to Contractor workers, Client staff, the general public and the environment will be eliminated or minimized - As Low As Reasonably Practical. (ALARP). 
 
This abovementioned process can be impacted by external factors such as, but not limited to Project financing (external HS requirements of international lenders); the country in which project is located (national workplace and driving safety cultures);  commitments to specific standards (OHSAS 18001, AS/NZS 4801-2001, OSHA…);  national and regional Occupational, Health, Safety and Environmental legislation;  and the background and experience of management staff.
 
If the project is financed by IFI or other similar lender institution, there will be many conditions attached to the loans, which will include adherence to IFI environmental, safety and social standards, guidelines, and recommended practices (IFC EHS Guidelines).  These IFI conditions will be incorporated into plans and procedures within a structured HSSE MS which provides assurance to the bank, that the project will be executed within the parameters of their established standards, and in so doing, address national  socio-economic and cultural conditions.  This HSSE MS provides an organized framework to address these conditions and to execute the project under an established set of HSSE controlling plans and procedures. 
 
A safe and healthy workplace does not happen by chance or guesswork.  What you put into this hazard identification process you will get back many times.  Evaluating hazards is not a simple process, due to the ambiguity inherent in the question: “Is it safe?”  What is “safe” to one person, may represent “unacceptable risk” to another, depending on knowledge of “Industry Standards” ,  lessons learned and levels of experience and where that experience was accrued.  Different project personnel will have different and conflicting answers to that simple question, often tempered by personal (short term financial bonus schedule for corporate staff) or other financial priorities.
 
Projects that are poorly conceived, behind schedule and over budget -  attempt to recoup shortfalls by reducing the HS budget and taking shortcuts in HS management such as but not limited to:
:
a)  inadequate identification of project construction hazards;
b)  inadequate allocation of  time and staff  for preparation of HS document deliverables; 
c)  inadequate HS  resources  ;
d)  inadequate competency assurance;
e)  inadequate compliance assurance with  the pipeline contract, the project HSMS, standards, and regulatory requirements;
f)  inadequate establishment of KPIs and corrective actions
….all of which put workers at risk and increase management liability.
 
OHSAS 18001
 
HSSE Management Systems are  modeled after different Standards.  In the 1990s the OHSAS 18001 model became the internationally accepted occupational health and safety management standard, which evolved from, expands on and is similar to the Deming Circle.  

Adherence to the OHSAS 18001 standard will not provide you assurance that all high risk construction activities will be identified  and controls implemented.  The standard only assures that you have a written plan to identify risks.  Whether or not your plan  has been implemented on site, or is in any way  effective is not or rarely evaluated within the certification process.
 
Alignment with OHSAS 18001, although not universally adopted, is more often than not, a project expectation, now that more than forty countries have adopted it as a standard.  OHSAS 18001 is a generic standard, against which any enterprises’ Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OH&S MS) can be assessed and certified. It was developed in the 1990s and officially released in April 1999.  The elements of the 18001 standard:  Continual Improvement; Management Review; OH&S Policy; Planning; Checking and Corrective Action; Implementation and Operation…are a good starting point.  Because of acceptance of this standard, today most HSSE Management Systems are very similar in scope. 
 
Other countries adopt similar OHS Management Models, for example the Australian AS/NZS 4801-2001  standard OHS Management System Model is a cut and paste  of the OHSAS 18001 model, with only slight changes.

HOW TO MANAGE WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY RISKS
Queensland, Australia Code of Practice 2011

Assurance that your Contractors are OHSAS 18001certified can give corporate managers a false sense of security. Theoretically OHSAS 18001 is an excellent standard which if fully implemented within the contractor organization on a pipeline construction project, will provide as good a starting point as could be desired, for  risk management.  The OHSAS 18001 standard requires planning for hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control.  Certification to the OHSAS 18001 Standard is commonly assumed to include implementation, however a very large percentage of companies are certified by certification bodies, only on the basis of a compliant, written HSSE Management system, without confirmation of  an acceptable level of site implementation.  Writing a compliant paper trail is the easy part, and often achieved by a cut and paste process managed by junior, inexperienced HS staff. The primary and critical issue of whether the management system is actually effective at identifying hazards and risks, is not evaluated within the terms of the standard.  Consequently reliance on certification to this standard, can and often does cause disappointment for the Client.  This disappointment manifests itself in the unexpected and poor safety culture of many OHSAS 18001 certified Contractors.  Additionally, within the framework of a lump sum contract, this is often the cause of the Client losing control of HS management on their own project.  This can be prevented by an OHSAS 18001 implementation audit of shortlisted contractors, prior to contract award, which will provide corporate managers with the data they need to evaluate a potential contractor´s commitment to HS.  
 
Knowledge of this commitment is critical for corporate managers in today´s recent history of catastrophic industrial accidents: Exxon Valdez oil spill, Texas City refinery explosion,  Deep Water Horizon oil spill,  Hungarian Ajka alumina chemical sludge spill, Fukushima nuclear disaster…. because  the standard clearly places the organization´s top management as responsible and liable.  At the start of a pipeline construction project, managers routinely commit to standards they don´t understand without any concept of how compliance with the specified standard will impact their schedule,  costs and their own personal liability.

Risk management on pipeline construction projects is an integral part of construction management
and cannot be separated from it.

Standards are accepted specifications which define methods, processes and practices.  Experience has shown that compliance with a standard will never guarantee a total satisfactory performance.  Accidents continue to happen.  In many cases pipelines were constructed just as safely, before the formulation of many of today’s accepted industry HSSE standards, before computers, smart phones and digital documentation.  Compliance with a standard may require substantial internal and external resources to develop additional HS documents, and implement compliance assurance auditing.  All this can be expensive to implement and maintain. Non compliance with these documents increases the personal liability of project managers.  Some standards are referenced in legislation and have now become mandatory in some countries.  Standards can be used in litigation as “accepted industry practices”, incurring liability if not all aspects of the standard have been implemented. Consequently there is a liability associated with integrating Standards into your HSMS. 
 
There are many recognized standards:  ANSI, ASME, OSHA, OHSAS 18001, AS/NZS 4801-2001,  UNE 81902,  SA 8000, NFPA, DOT, BSI, CDM Regulations, DNV, SCC, TÜV, EU, ILO-OSH,  ISO 14001, , ISO 9001…  Frequently,  project management commits to compliance with complex standards, such as OSHA or  AS/NZS 4801-2001, with an associated abundance of mandatory documentation,  without a full understanding  of how such compliance will impact their project.  The project starts off with high-profile declarations at public “town hall” meetings about introducing to the country new and high standards and strict compliance.  Then, as the impact on schedule and costs of compliance become known, management surreptitiously backs off from their initial enthusiasm and their commitment to compliance is diluted into declarations of using OSHA or other standards as “guidelines for improvement”.   Alternatively the project starts with memorable HS slogans repeated at office “flow meetings”, offered as key elements of the project HSMS :  "See Something/Say Something/Do Something" - "What can go wrong? / What can cause it to go wrong?  What can I do to prevent it?”  These are extremely effective at changing behaviors and valuable project HS tools.  However  as the impact of budget and schedule deficits are felt, staff who identify areas for improvement are penalized for being out of line with the “integrated management team”  The consequence is a failure of the HSMS with subsequent increase in recordable incidents. The first time you as a manager allow safety to take second place to schedule, the news will spread through the workforce like a wild fire. Everyone is watching and talking.  This is how the momentum of a carefully conceived and implemented HSMS can become undermined. Disillusioned workers don’t participate.  Safety really is simply an attitude.

Oil & Gas Companies financing their own projects, as part of an expansion, replacement or looping program are not bound by external  standards and guidelines.  Established Pipeline Operators, with long experience in expansion and looping construction, may have management staff with many years of on-site construction experience in all aspects of pipeline construction.  These companies will possess a proven Construction Safe Operations Manual, which will be referenced within the contract, and so be contractually binding.  All parties, Contractors included, will be accustomed to complying with the established construction practices in this manual.  The Contractors working for these pipeline operators will have a Company Safety Manual, which establishes an HSSE Policy, and includes an inventory of Safe Work Practices and Procedures and specific Environmental Guidelines.  On these types of projects industry standards are known and accepted.  The HSSE MS documentation for this type of pipeline construction scenario will be limited and streamlined, and the work will be executed quickly and safely.
 
In instances where a Company has financed an international project, the lenders will have many expectations outlined in an Environmental Impact Assessment (ESIA)  that will require the development of numerous, predominantly Environmental and Social documents within the HSSE MS.  Oil & Gas Companies with experience managing international pipeline construction projects generally have a core of construction staff and an established Company Construction HSSE MS.  Companies lacking an experienced construction team, often start a project with a severe handicap.  Such companies may implement an existing company Operations HSSE MS to control the risks associated with the construction process, not recognizing that operational risks and construction risks are as different as night and day, and must be managed using different methods.  Additionally, a construction and HSSE management team with little or no practical knowledge of pipeline construction may be recruited for the project, drawn from the company’s offshore exploration or refinery sectors.
 
International Oil & Gas companies, accustomed to working under International Financial Institution (IFI) standards,  with head offices  and operational practices originating  in demographic regions, with well established standards, often have volumes of  HSSE Management Systems documents.  The HSSE MS document map of some of these companies is so extensive, that much of the paperwork and processes serve no real purpose in identifying hazards, evaluating risks, or preventing accidents.   Contracted construction management staff who have worked for these Oil & Gas companies on other projects,  often wrongly assume that this familiar HSSE MS is the pipeline industry standard.  An HSSE MS comprised of many volumes of documents does not deliver a safer project.  HSSE Management Systems have to be tailored to the requirements of the stakeholders, the safety culture of the national workforce and other variables, and may be different from project to project.
 
Lack of a comprehensive knowledge of pipeline construction hazards and risks during the engineering phase, well before the kick off of construction, when documents and contracts are drawn up, is the single most frequent cause of the failure of an HSSE management system.  An HSSE manager and/or HSSE advisor who is experienced with pipeline construction and possesses a detailed knowledge of pipeline construction methods, is an essential member of the management team. Be wary of construction and QA management who may claim on their CVs to be experts in risk management.  They have spent their careers focused on other issues and priorities and the extent of their HSSE knowledge is often limited.  Corporate HSSE managers are often recruited from operations, offshore, or other unrelated industries.  Consequently those planning the HSSE project strategy often have little if any practical knowledge of industry specific lessons learned, the equipment capabilities and work methodology.  Surprisingly, lessons learned from the right of way during the construction phase are never collated for future projects. This critical knowledge leaves the project in the hands of the HSSE contracted supervision, at the termination of their contract. 

H&S vs. Environmental Management

Effective Health and Safety management is more difficult to assess than Environmental management because environmental issues for the most part are quantifiable and HS issues are perceived as not quantifiable.  This perception is incorrect. The good news is that practical experience, comprehensive hazard identification and historic lessons learned can provide quantifiable, best-practice safety baselines to manage the risks inherent in your work process.  Audits can deliver a numerical grade to accurately identify the extent of implementation of your HSSE MS and a numeric representation of the likelihood of future project losses. 
(See PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION E-LEARNING CENTRE on this website’s home page.) 
 
 Physical, biological, social, and archeological baselines are established in the EIA.  Many environmental issues such as fauna groups, vegetation sampling points, numbers of bird, mammal, and reptile species, erosion & sediment control, noise and air pollution, vibration, hydrobiology, soil management and agrostology are physically measurable.  This simplifies the task of environmental management.  Getting Health & Safety management right is much more difficult, because such physical measurements are not available to tell you if a construction technique is safe or not.  Consequently there are often disproportionate resources allocated to environment and social impacts, compared to Health and Safety  project impacts.  Due to a universal lack of knowledge of historic pipeline specific lessons learned and to a fear of assuming liability, best-practice baselines in safety are limited to compliance with work place regulations and codes of practice, neither of which are aimed to manage risks specifically during  pipeline construction. If you provide  work instructions, based on these two parameters, you leave significant gaps in your risk management. 
 
Over the last 40 years two factors have a come into play which impact HSSE management:

  • The workforce has aged and now it is not unusual to see septuagenarians as site supervision, welding pipe or operating side booms. During the 60s – 90’s, Spread Men and Construction Managers worked their way up through the trades during which time they learned the work inside out.
  • As the population has aged, the younger generation, brought up in the age of digital electronic devices, is not interested in this type of work, which includes arduous conditions, long hours, often poor accommodation, and isolation from family and friends.  This lack of interest, as the older generation has retired, has resulted in a loss of the accumulated knowledge of the previous generation and the widespread entry of management-engineers with little or no practical knowledge of the work process.

On a pipeline construction project risks fall into two categories: Transportation Risks and Work Phase Risks.

  1. Transportation accidents constitute the highest proportion of HSSE lagging indicators, which can quickly drag down your incident frequency statistics.  In countries/regions that have extremely rugged terrain, poor road maintenance, and zero safe driving culture, the project’s Transportation Management Plan becomes a project HSSE document critical in delivering target HSSE goals.
  2. Work Phase Risks are known by Pipeline Industry HS expert consultants. The Pipeline Construction Industry is more than 60 years old.  The equipment and methodology have not changed a great deal over time.  Many lessons have been learned.  Application of these lessons learned through seamless on site supervision will deliver project target HSSE goals. If your project team does not have access to a database of these lessons learned, you would be well advised to bring in an external advisor to enhance your HAZID/MHRA  sessions and provide mentoring for your HSSE staff.

Some countries have highly developed national Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) legislation, including stringent due diligence legislation, which assigns accountability and culpability following accidents.  These countries with established pipeline infrastructures have a highly trained and skilled itinerant workforce which follows the pipeline work from place to place, often crossing national boundaries.  Here an extensive Craft Training Plan may not be necessary.  Other countries with similar due diligence legislation, such as Australia currently have little history of large diameter pipeline construction, where conversely management of craft training, and competency assurance, especially on side boom operation is critical.  In these countries a simple requirement for compliance with the national regulatory requirements will mitigate a lot, but not all risks.  Rules and regulations may exist, but people the world over, inherently do not like to obey rules.  In other countries that have only token or poorly developed HSSE national legislation,  more extensive plans and procedures may need to be considered to effectively control risks.

Money Talks

On all projects, locking the Contractor into written detailed HSSE commitments, identified in a contractually binding commitments register, HSSE plans, procedures, and other HSSE documents, is an effective and essential means of delivering an accident free project.  Contractually binding documents which identify specific project HSSE standards, objectives, expectations, penalties for non-compliance and rewards for exceptional performance, provide the assurance that all Health, Safety and Environmental hazards and risks will be identified and controlled and the work performed in a manner that will not pollute the environment, nor expose the workers and general public to risks.  Without penalties for non compliance, the Contractor management will not follow the established plan as closely as they will with monetary penalties attached to non-compliance.  These financial incentives ensure that your Contractors allocate sufficient resources to ensure their front line supervision, the right of way foreman, embrace the requirements in your HSSE plans and procedures.  The success of your HSSE MS hinges almost entirely on these foremen, many of whom will be, if not illiterate, severely challenged with the volumes of documents.  If the Contractor foremen do not buy into the HSSE MS, accidents and losses will occur.

During the planning and preparation of documents,  ensuring that the myriad of known risks are controlled through HSSE MS documentation, must be  balanced  against a clear liability associated with giving direct  instructions to the  Contractor of how to execute the work.  Perceived liability can play a significant part in steering the HSSE planning of many projects. For this reason many project contracts do not contain sufficient Client specified and mandated HSSE requirements. Withholding a percentage of progress payments for poor HSSE performance, as measured by periodic audits of project key performance leading and lagging indicators, is a common and effective method to assure Contractor compliance. The larger the percentage of hold back, the better will be the Contractor´s HSSE performance.  Additionally, during the engineering phase of the project, early HSSE input into the tender offering,  and contractually binding project documents such as the project execution plan, pipeline specifications and other critical project execution documents is essential to ensure that risks will be managed during execution.

Accidents predict injuries

Client project management staff, including HSSE management, may have limited knowledge of the actual work methodology and less knowledge of the pipeline construction industry´s, historic and reoccurring accidents and their causes.  If management staff does not have the accrued experience and knowledge of lessons learned, and is not familiar with how the work is executed, they will inevitably be the weak link in your management team, and will need external support.  Often this lack of experience in pipeline construction is a consequence of project HR recruitment policies. Industry specific experience takes second place to academic and engineering credentials on recruiting agency internet sites and job application forms, when sourcing HSSE management staff for international projects. HSSE is identified as an “expertise” or “discipline”.  The HSSE “discipline” is knowledge of a simple generic system, which cannot be expected to be effective without a parallel knowledge of the complex specific industry sector practices, hazards, risks and lessons learned, to which it is applied. Additionally recruiters may place a priority on their own financial margins, thereby not delivering the CVs of best qualified candidates for the Client to review.
The experience depicted in the many photographs found on this website cannot be gained from engineering textbooks.   Nor can you learn from a textbook how to talk to, engage and gain the respect of the men and women in the industry’s workforce.  Without this ability to discuss the work processes in a knowledgeable manner and thereby engage the workers, your HSSE management will be ineffective.  Safety cannot be managed on a computer screen from a distance.  It must be managed primarily onsite, at ground level, throug

You cannot hammer a nail on the internet

After contract award and before the start of construction, the Client will require the Contractor to: 

  1. Break down and itemize the scope of the work.
  2. Systematically identify associated hazards and risks for each phase of the work in a formal HAZID.
  3. Generate a list of all high risk construction activities.
  4. Assess and prioritize the risks associated with each activity and develop controls to eliminate or reduce risks to a tolerable and as low as reasonable and practical level.
  5. Document these controls in plans and procedures. 
  6. Provide a list of these HSSE document deliverables.

At the kick-off meeting, Client and Contractor will agree to the list of deliverables. .
 
Typical Contractor HSSE Documentation Deliverables such as but not limited to the following: 

 

  • Project baseline HSSE plans: 
    Project Safe Work Practices and Procedures for each of 30 - 200 High Risk Activities:

    • Confined Space - Pipe Entry Pipe and Materials Handling
      Moving Equipment Under and Working in Proximity to Overhead Power Lines
      Use of Heavy Equipment in Proximity to Buried Pressurized Pipelines
      Pipe Hauling, Stringing, Stockpiling, Loading & Offloading
      Locating, Day Lighting & Excavating Buried Utilities
      Transportation of Dangerous Goods
      Abrasive Blasting
      Tool Maintenance and Inspection
      External Pipe Coating Application
      Lower-in
      Use of High or Low Voltage Holiday Detectors
      Hydro Test
      Propane Management
      Winching
      Towing
      Working Alone
      Handling Fiber Optic Cable
      X-Ray - Radiographic Inspection
      Storage of X-Ray Source
      Electric Water Pumps - Setup and Use
      Traffic Management on Public Roads
      Chainsaw use
      Hauling Equipment on Public Roads
      Hydrotest water filtering
      Spill Response
      Spill Containment
      Stream and Water Body Crossings and Sedimentation Control
      Topsoil Separation
      Slope Stability and Erosion
      Drainage Management
      Improvised sorbent booms
      Diversion Berm Configurations
      ROW Two-Toning
      Construction De-Watering Discharges
      Washing Restrictions
      Fuel and Chemical Storage and Handling
      Water Crossings
      Emergencies and Evacuation
      Respiratory Protection
      Blood borne Pathogens
      Personal Protective Equipment PPE
      Hazard Communication
      Non Destructive Testing
      Housekeeping
      Fire Prevention
      Floor and Wall Openings
      Scaffolding
      Heat and Cold Stress
      Hearing Conservation
      Air Sampling & Monitoring
      Barricades
      Excavation and Trenching
      Confined or Enclosed Spaces
      Hazardous Work Permit
      Portable Ladders
      Compressed Gas Cylinders
      Electrical Equipment
      Safety Watches
      Asbestos Hazards
      Radiation Protection
      Medical Surveillance
      Drinking Water and Ice
      Night Work
      Railroad Crossings
      Road Crossings
      Side boom, Crane and Material Handling
      Fire Prevention and Protection
      Smoking Regulations
      Rigging
      Emergency Flushing of Eyes and/or Body
      Office HSSE
      Fiber Optic Hazard Recognition
      Lasers
      Washing Facilities
      Lunch Rooms
      Concrete Products
      Saws
      Jacks, Rollers and Related Devices
      Pile Driving and Dredging
      Transportation of Workers
      Exits
      Flag persons
      Propane LPG
      Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS)
      Root Cause Analysis
      Occupational Health Records
      Government Agency Inspections

    • Project Safe Work Practices and Procedures for each of 30 - 200 High Risk Activities:
       
    • Confined Space - Pipe Entry
      Pipe and Materials Handling
      Moving Equipment Under and Working in Proximity to Overhead Power Lines
      Use of Heavy Equipment in Proximity to Buried Pressurized Pipelines
      Pipe Hauling, Stringing, Stockpiling, Loading & Offloading
      Locating, Day Lighting & Excavating Buried Utilities
      Transportation of Dangerous Goods
      Abrasive Blasting
      Tool Maintenance and Inspection
      External Pipe Coating Application
      Lower-in
      Use of High or Low Voltage Holiday Detectors
      Hydro Test
      Propane Management
      Winching
      Towing
      Working Alone
      Handling Fiber Optic Cable
      X-Ray - Radiographic Inspection
      Storage of X-Ray Source
      Electric Water Pumps - Setup and Use
      Traffic Management on Public Roads
      Chainsaw use
      Hauling Equipment on Public Roads
      Hydrotest water filtering
      Spill Response
      Spill Containment
      Stream and Water Body Crossings and Sedimentation Control
      Topsoil Separation
      Slope Stability and Erosion
      Drainage Management
      Improvised sorbent booms
      Diversion Berm Configurations
      ROW Two-Toning
      Construction De-Watering Discharges
      Washing Restrictions
      Fuel and Chemical Storage and Handling
      Water Crossings
      Emergencies and Evacuation
      Respiratory Protection
      Blood borne Pathogens
      Personal Protective Equipment PPE
      Hazard Communication
      Non Destructive Testing
      Housekeeping
      Fire Prevention
      Floor and Wall Openings
      Scaffolding
      Heat and Cold Stress
      Hearing Conservation
      Air Sampling & Monitoring
      Barricades
      Excavation and Trenching
      Confined or Enclosed Spaces
      Hazardous Work Permit
      Portable Ladders
      Compressed Gas Cylinders
      Electrical Equipment
      Safety Watches
      Asbestos Hazards
      Radiation Protection
      Medical Surveillance
      Drinking Water and Ice
      Night Work
      Railroad Crossings
      Road Crossings
      Side boom, Crane and Material Handling
      Fire Prevention and Protection
      Smoking Regulations
      Rigging
      Emergency Flushing of Eyes and/or Body
      Office HSSE
      Fiber Optic Hazard Recognition
      Lasers
      Washing Facilities
      Lunch Rooms
      Concrete Products
      Saws
      Jacks, Rollers and Related Devices
      Pile Driving and Dredging
      Transportation of Workers
      Exits
      Flag persons
      Propane LPG
      Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS)
      Root Cause Analysis
      Occupational Health Records
      Government Agency Inspections
       
  •  
  • Safe Work Method Statements
  • Risk assessments
  • Minutes of job hazard Analyses
  • Minutes of toolbox talks
  • Safe Work Method Statements
  • Minutes of all HSSE meetings
  • Completed HSSE compliance assurance inspections
  • Internal HSSE audits
  • External  audit reports
  • Vehicle and Equipment monitoring, maintenance and repair documentation
  • HSSE and technical Certifications required by the Authorities Having Jurisdiction
  • Weekly /Monthly HSSE reports
  • Training records
  • Competency assurance records
  • Reports of progress towards meeting objectives and targets
  • Non-conformance and corrective actions reports
  • Incident, Accident, Near Miss  and investigation reports
  • First Aid Records
  • Accident/Incident investigations
  • Spill reports
  • Loss Prevention records
  • Key Performance indicator records



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